Todas las bibliotecas abrirán a las 12:00 p. m. el jueves 27 de junio debido a la capacitación del personal.

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Del 21 de mayo al 14 de julio: la Biblioteca Eastside estará cerrada debido a trabajos de construcción.

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In 2008 the Creeks Division initiated the Invasive Plant Removal Program.  The main focus of this effort is to remove non-native, invasive plants from City creeks in order to restore riparian ecosystems. In general, invasive plants have the ability to negatively affect native species (both plants and animals) and cause significant degradation of ecosystem processes.  

The Creeks Division has been working over the last several years to remove an invasive plant known as Arundo donax, or giant reed, from the Arroyo Burro, Mission, and Sycamore Creek Watersheds. Arundo is a fast growing plant that displaces native plants and reduces habitat value for wildlife. The massive dense stands also present fire and flooding hazards.  As part of this program, Creeks staff have conducted landowner outreach, coordinated with the Santa Barbara County Flood Control District and Agricultural Commissioner’s Office, applied for grants and permits, and developed removal and revegetation plans. Giant reed removal efforts have taken place along Sycamore Creek, Mission Creek, and Arroyo Burro.  Giant reed was also removed from the Bird Refuge in coordination with the Santa Barbara Zoo, Channel Islands Restoration, and the Southern California Wetlands Recovery Project.   On-going monitoring and retreatment of giant reed at all of the removal locations is necessary to ensure the giant reed is completely eradicated. 

If you have giant reed on your property and are interested in having it removed, please contact us via email at Creeks@SantaBarbaraCA.gov.

Additional Invasives Common to Santa Barbara

Pampas Grass
Pampas Grass

Cortaderia selloana or Cortaderia jubata is a quickly growing grass that forms massive clumps along roadsides, steep cliffs, river banks, and open areas that have been disturbed by human activities or natural disturbances. Introduced to Santa Barbara, California in 1848 by nursery operators, pampas grass has spread all over the state, threatening native plants and the animals that rely on them.

Native alternative: Giant wildrye

English Ivy
English Ivy

Hedera helix, a vine from Europe, is often planted for its greenery but can become a problem as it spreads quickly, choking out other plants and harming trees. It thrives in various conditions and can even invade natural areas, costing time and money to remove. Its leaves and fruits are toxic, and it can irritate the skin. 

Native alternative: Alumroot

Castor Bean
Castor Bean

Ricinus communis, a tall shrub with large leaves and sharp edges, often grows near waterways and spreads quickly, crowding out native plants. It's commonly found in abandoned fields, along roadsides, and after fires, where it takes over and forms dense stands, harming native vegetation. Its seeds are poisonous to a wide range of animals, including humans, with just two beans being potentially lethal if ingested.
 

Tree Tobacco
Tree Tobacco

Nicotiana glauca is a tree/shrub (family Solanaceae), which stands 10-20 feet tall and is short-lived. Tree tobacco was introduced to California about 100 years ago and is found growing up to 5,000 feet in disturbed soils, vacant lots, along roadsides, streamsides, and other riparian areas. 
 

Fountain Grass
Fountain Grass

Pennisetum setaceum, originally from Northern Africa, has become invasive in California, particularly in the southwestern United States where it's often planted for landscaping. Its seeds spread easily through wind, animals, and human activities. Although its impact on California's natural habitats is still being studied, it's known to alter fire cycles and habitats. This grass forms dense stands, promoting the spread of fire and hindering the growth of other plants after a fire. Its invasion contributes to the decline of native habitats like coastal sage scrub in southern California. Computer models suggest that areas with similar climates could also be at risk of invasion by fountain grass.

Native alternative: Mendocino reed grass

Periwinkle
Periwinkle

Vinca major is a spreading perennial vine or ground cover (family Apocynaceae) with dark green stems that contain milky latex. In California it is rapidly spreading in most coastal counties, foothill woodlands, the Central Valley, and even desert areas. Periwinkle has escaped from garden plantings, and lowers species diversity and disrupts native plant communities. Riparian zones are particularly sensitive. Fragments of periwinkle vines can break, wash downstream, and start new invasions.

Native alternative: Ground morning glory

Myoporum
Myoporum (Ngaio tree)

Myoporum laetum is an evergreen shrub or small tree (family Myoporaceae) found along the coast of California and in the San Francisco Bay region. It favors coastal areas, woodlands and riparian areas. This landscape ornamental has white flowers with purple dots and reddish-purple fruits. Ngaio tree has escaped cultivation in many areas, and is commonly found near urban areas. It is native to New Zealand. It may crowd out native plants, growing to form dense stands.